Ferrules

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Ferrules

Postby gainesw » Wed Jun 29, 2005 6:04 am

My pet peeve is FERRULES. The first thing I look at when I check a custom made club or any non oem club put together by anyone is how well the ferrule has been turned down and it's appearence. I personally think this repersents what kind of quality the clubmaker puts out. You can have all the knowledge in the world, but if you do not present it professionally, you have lost the battle and your credibility.I turn my ferrules with a linen belt,counterclockwise using a ferrule support arm. I then us a dab of ascetone and buff with a strip of chamois cloth to get that glossy shine. I want my clients to be able to put one of my clubs next to any oem and see that my quality is as good or better than theirs.
I would like to hear how some of you other guys do it,so maybe I can come up with a better mouse trap.

Gaines

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Postby drollins » Wed Jun 29, 2005 6:13 am

Gaines,

I use the same process but once they're turned, I give the ferrule one complete turn on an acetone-soaked wad of paper towel then let them air dry (about 30 seconds). They do get tiny concentric lines around them from the paper towel but they're wicked shiny!

Do you use the chamois after they're dry or do you apply the accetone to the chamois? I've been looking for a method that will not leave those tiny lines in the ferrule. Also, I find the linen belt leaves a little crown to the profile of the ferrule but they're all consistent.

Well, it looks like I answered your question with more of my own. What a bummer.[:0]

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Postby gainesw » Wed Jun 29, 2005 6:25 am

Don;
I use a piece of 1" X 6" chamois after I let the ascetone dry, about 15 to 20 seconds. You will be surprised how long a piece of chamois cloth will last.I solved the problem with the crown by taking the bolts out of my sanding belt and and letting it run not mounted on a angle,instead of the conventional 90* angle.The weight of the unit it self will keep it from moving. I apply very light pressure when turning the ferrule.I had to raise my belt unit anyway so I sat it on one of my plastic fishing tackle cases to absorb the vibrations so it would not move.

Gaines

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Postby TWW » Wed Jun 29, 2005 6:38 am

GAINES:

Way way back when I used to do a lot of club repair before I got into this side of the business, I used to do a lot of wooden head refinishing - like about 35,000 of them between 1972 and 1979! Ugh! Anyway, I used to always do a Glanz Wach buffing on an unstitched buffing wheel of all refinished woods after the last spray coat of poly was dry to really deepen the gloss. Then one day for some dumb reason I did this to a ferrule on and iron and wow, it really made the shine of the ferrules pop. So as a result of that I started to Glanz Wach all exposed ferrules after turning down and acetoning. Don;t know if anyone sells Glanz Wach bars and unstitched buffing wheels anymore but it really did add a little more to the look of the ferrule.

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Postby gainesw » Wed Jun 29, 2005 6:44 am

Tom;
What in the world is Glanz Wach? What kind of substance is it. Can it be replaced with another kind substance that will maybe do the same thing? Why does the unstiched wheel work better than the stiched wheel. My motto is ADAPT AND OVERCOME. Maybe we can figure out a way to do it with another substance and method to get the same results.I really like the sound of this process!!


Gaines

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Postby drollins » Wed Jun 29, 2005 6:45 am

Gaines,

Thanks, I'll try lightening up on the pressure a little and give the chamois a try. I don't have my unit bolted down either, had to move it too many times.

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Postby TWW » Wed Jun 29, 2005 6:48 am

GAINES:

It is a bar of wax compound that is hard, sort of a little greasy feeling to the touch and a yellowish color. You would start up the unstitched buffing wheels and just hold the end of the bar against the rotating wheels to coat the surface of the buffing wheels with the wax. I would guess that if you found any type of bar wax that could be put on unstitched buffing wheels that would work too. And while I have never tried it, perhaps just any car wax even with hand buffing might deepen the shine of the ferrule.

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Postby Yogi » Wed Jun 29, 2005 6:51 am

Try any synthetic wax. Especially something like car detailers are using now on bumpers.

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Postby gainesw » Wed Jun 29, 2005 6:53 am

TOM
If I understand you correctly,it sounds like what I do with jewelers rouge and a buffing wheel now to shine up a chrome iron head. Am I on the right track? If so, I am going to use some car wax in my shop tonight and try it.I have never put a post on here that I didn't learn something. I LOVE IT !!

Gaines

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Postby user504 » Wed Jun 29, 2005 7:01 am

Thanks Tom,I was begining to think I would have to get rid of my unstitched buffing wheel and buffing compound and get a piece of chamois to be up to date.However as I am still doing wood refurbs,delivered 2 pings and a ginty today, I suppose I had better keep my buffing wheels,even If I feel like a relic from the past.
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Postby user504 » Wed Jun 29, 2005 7:10 am

Have just looked at my Golf Works catalog.page130 glaz wach and buffing wheels are still available.
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Postby TWW » Wed Jun 29, 2005 7:22 am

GAINES:

I don't think so because from my experience in polishing irons (and man is that a job you don;t want full time!!) all of the metal polishing compounds have some grit and would probably be too aggressive on something as soft as an ABS plastic ferrule. First thing I'd do to save me a trip to the store would be to see if you have any car wax and try that first. If it doesn;t then Yogi's advice in his post is where I would head next.

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Postby jogier » Wed Jun 29, 2005 7:59 am

I've been using glanz wach with a stiched wheel for years now and have had no problems. What is thew advantage of an unstiched wheel?

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Postby mjremote » Wed Jun 29, 2005 1:44 pm

check harbor freight they have they buffing wheels and bench grinders. not sure if they have the polishing compounds. I have done that when I worked for the last clubmaker that I learned most of my skills from and it definitely does add lots to the look of the product. and I must admit turning ferrules is a skill I have yet to master although I am getting better
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Postby user504 » Thu Jun 30, 2005 12:35 am

Jogier-- The advantage of using an unstitched wheel is that before using the wheel you use a buffing wheel rake to remove old compound to prevent a build up which could result in the work getting scratched.I doubt if over a period of time you can prevent a build up on a stitched Wheel.Do remember the purpose of the buffing wheels was to polish the finish on wooden headed clubs.You may well find that as you are only buffing ferrules you may not get problems of old compound damaging your work,it's up to you.
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