WEDGES

The uniquely innovative 309HCG wedges draw upon the proven science of vertical gear effect to achieve an increase in backspin.  Experienced clubmakers are aware that impact below the CG (Centre of Gravity) with a driver increases backspin due to the principle of the vertical gear effect.  

Wishon Golf has employed this lesser known principle of clubhead dynamics to create an all new family of wedges that deliver enhanced backspin by moving mass higher on the head to position the CG above the typical point of impact on the face.  Impact below the CG causes the head to rotate slightly forward which causes the ball to roll up the face to offer a slight increase in backspin over the normal reaction of the ball to the friction of the areas between scorelines.  Adding to the spin enhancing weight distribution on the 309HCG wedges is the R&A/USGA legal milled face. 

  • More mass high on the head raises the CG to create a vertical gear effect on normal impacts to augment the amount of backspin.  
  • R&A/USGA legal milled face augments the effect of the higher CG to enhance backspin.   
  • Available in 50°, 55°, 60° lofts in the traditional sole width version as well as a 55° wide sole model for additional game improvement help from the sand and tall grass.   
  • Designed with zero bounce heel to prevent raising the leading edge when the face is rolled open to reduce the chance of blading/skulling the ball from tight lies.  
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Scott Martin
4 months ago

Looks very familiar don’t you think? Did they copy Wishon!?

IMG_5301
Garth
7 months ago

HI Tom, is the 431 stainless steel annealed ( like the the 310 wedge)? and could you speak to the differences in feel at impact between 431 s/s (+ annealed) and 304 s/s for the average golfer.

thanks again

Admin
7 months ago
Reply to  Garth

GARTH The only purpose of annealing 431 stainless in a wedge or iron is to help make it a little easier to bend the hosel for lie and loft changes in fitting. It has no other function in the head other than that. 304 stainless is a far lower strength alloy than 431. It is so soft and ductile that any head made from it would be easier to bend for L/L changes than even the typical carbon steels used in forging. In fact, when thinking about 304 stainless for an iron or wedge, you definitely would never use it… Read more »

Garth
7 months ago

HI Tom, could you please expand on the idea of using a verical gear effect in a wedge? is it all about the ball staying on a lofted, rougher face surface, longer.

thanks

Admin
7 months ago
Reply to  Garth

GARTH Perhaps you have heard that the ideal point of impact for higher speed players on a driver is about 3/8″ above the center of the face. From this slightly higher center impact point, the ball flies with less spin but has a high enough launch to achieve good hang time for better carry. The reason the ball takes off with less spin is because impact ABOVE the CG on the face causes slight vertical gear effect which brings about the lower spin. This is because hitting above the CG causes the clubhead to slightly rotate backward around the horizontal… Read more »

Joe
10 months ago

Tom, I have a set of Sterling irons (6 – PW) @ 36.875″ with a swing weight of D0. I just received your EQ1-NX 6i and 7i to replace the Sterling 6i and 7i and looking to add your 50 and 55 degree 309 HCG wedges as well as a 45 degree PW to replace the Sterling PW- I find in Single Length the PW doesn’t work for me. Looking at wedges at 45, 50 and 55 degrees at more traditional wedge lengths what swing weight would recommend to go with the remaining EQ1 and Sterling irons. Thanks.

Joe

Admin
9 months ago
Reply to  Joe

JOE The best thing to do when trying to match std length wedges to an 8 iron length single length set would be to measure the MOI of the single length irons and then duplicate that in the wedges, if you can. That does require working with a clubmaker who has the MOI measurement machine and knowledge of how to build clubs to a specific MOI. If that is impossible, then do the same swingweight of the single length irons in the conventional length wedges as a starting point. That is probably going to be difficult to do since all… Read more »

Joe McManuis
9 months ago
Reply to  Tom Wishon

Tom,thanks for your comments. At my playing length and the shaft I use 1/2″ shorter for the wedges should match the swing weight of my present EQ1 irons so I will build an EQ1 accordingly and evaluate further. Thanks again.

Joe

Will Adair
11 months ago

Hi Tom,

Could you explain the differences in the 309hcg wedges and the 310mg? Foe example, I’m looking for clubs mostly for full swing, so forgiveness is important to me.

Admin
11 months ago
Reply to  Will Adair

WILL
309 are standard scorelines but milled face and have a conventional sole grind – in addition there is a wide sole version of the SW for players who need a little help with getting the ball out of the bunker. 310 have a straighter leading edge with a special sole grind that adds bounce to the very front center narrow section of the sole so knock down shots dig less and for more hands ahead play from turf like Bermuda.
TOM

Jim Hoover
1 year ago

Tom,

This may be a totally impossible thing to do, but would it be possible to do toe grinds on the SW of 18g and LW of 22g to get head weight down to 278g to match a EQ1-NX single length set with that head weight? I realize it will move CG toward the hosel but not sure how much it would change the club performance. Not to mention affecting the appearance. This is just something that I was thinking of trying. Just to see if I could do it.

Admin
1 year ago
Reply to  Jim Hoover

JIM Trying to take more than 20g off the 309 SW and LW to get them down to single length weight would really be difficult to do without visibly changing the shape and sole of the wedges. The preferred area to remove weight from a wedge in the first place is from the sole and then the back, never from the toe, because the toe area is pretty thin. You’d totally change the profile of the shape by taking even 5g off the toe area of the head. THen too, on the sole, you could get 10g off the sole… Read more »

Rex Ryan
1 year ago

Tom, I have a shallow of attack and need advice for choosing between the 309-55 and 309-55-WS. Also can you give any information as to how the new wedges to follow will differ between the 309 series. Thanks.

Admin
1 year ago
Reply to  Rex Ryan

REX I don’t view the sole width as being a decision point for a more shallow entry to impact. Now if you were more steep, then I would say the wider sole would be a little better. So for you, I would see the decider being how well you keep the clubhead moving through impact and especially how well you do this or not in sand. If you ever have any tendency to leave the ball in the sand, I would go with the wider sole version. The 310 would be better for players who like to play more of… Read more »

Bill Posters
1 year ago

Tom, I have your previous Wide Sole Wedge but prefer this new one. From the pictures I can’t see the face milling being circular. Is it similar to your previous model or has it been redesiged to be more effective and are there any other design changes to improve performance. Thanks.

Admin
1 year ago
Reply to  Bill Posters

BILL Thank you, I appreciate that you like the new 309 wide sole. I did too when I was shaping the head and the sole!! The face milling is circular and it is within the USGA’s very strict specs for how rough the milling can be. They police this at 0.1mm from the peak to the trough of between milling lines, so that is pretty faint. In all honesty, if you can lay your hands on one of the old PCF Micro wedges that were milled face, they slid through with rougher milling than what is allowed these days. But… Read more »

Bill Posters
1 year ago
Reply to  Tom Wishon

Tom, thanks. Although I am good for wedges (this widesole keeps coming to mind) this wedge seems a good fit with the new 585PC irons- you have winners with both!!

Bill